2011
06.07

The University of Oregon will also begin hosting the exhibitions “Shall We Dance?” and “Track Town, USA,” during the week of June 20

EUGENE, Ore. — The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Arts presents selections from Brian Lanker’s “I Dream a World: Portraits of Black Women Who Changed America,” on view from June 21-Sept. 11, 2011 in the Focus Gallery.

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2011
04.03

Life behind the lens: Rich Clarkson

By LINDSAY H. JONES
The Denver Post

Rich Clarkson and his childhood pals followed the unmistakable thump thump thump up three flights of stairs until they reached a set of beaten-up wooden doors. The 7-year-old boys peered through the window and, sure enough, found what they were looking for. Through the glass, they saw them, the 1939 Kansas Jayhawks, in the middle of an early-season practice inside Robinson Gymnasium on the KU campus in Lawrence. Feeling brave, the boys pushed open the doors, sneaked inside and quietly took a seat on the gym floor against the back wall.

Read the complete story at The Denver Post >>

2011
04.01

Many Thanks To You, Brian Lanker

By BRUCE THORSON

LINCOLN, Neb. — Brian Lanker’s recent passing has left us saddened, stunned and shocked.

I was Lanker’s lab tech, joining the Eugene Register-Guard in July 1981. He was really my first photojournalism mentor and teacher. He was meticulous and demanding. He was a thinker first and a photographer second. As his lab tech I was on the periphery of his influence and teaching. Still, he had a profound effect on me as a photojournalist. Many thanks, Brian Lanker, for the lessons I learned from you.

Read the complete story at NPPA >>

2011
03.21

My friend Brian Lanker

By J.B. FORBES
St. Louis Post-Dispatch Pictures Blog

My friend Brian Lanker died last week. He was one of the best photographers in the world. And he was a very good person. At 63, he was much too young to leave us.

Read the complete essay >>

2011
03.20

Lanker’s legacy: Photographer, artist

Topeka colleagues remember Pulitzer prize-winning photographer

By JAN BILES
The Capital-Journal

Former Topeka Capital-Journal environmental writer Mike Tharp remembers spending Christmas Day 1970 in the federal penitentiary in Leavenworth taking notes and conducting interviews.

Tharp was there because Capital-Journal photojournalist Brian Lanker had asked him to come along to write a story to accompany his images documenting how inmates spent their holiday.

Read the complete story at The Topeka Capital-Journal >>

2011
03.19

Life, love and light

Brian Lanker leaves behind a legacy as a pioneering photographer with a generous spirit

By KRISTI TURNQUIST
The Oregonian

Brian Lanker’s son, Dustin, and stepdaughter, Julia Coburn, had been planning weddings for later this year — until three weeks ago, when Lanker was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.

“When the news came in that he was really ill, I think we all had the same thought,” says Dustin. Julia was married at the family home in Eugene on March 11; Dustin married his fiancée the next day.

Read the complete story at The Oregonian >>

2011
03.19

Brian Lanker’s obituary from The New York Times

Download a PDF of Brian Lanker’s obituary that appeared in the print edition of The New York Times on Saturday, March 19, 2011.

2011
03.18

Brian Lanker, Pulitzer-Winning Photojournalist, Dies at 63

By DAVID W. DUNLAP
The New York Times

Brian Lanker, a photojournalist who showed that small-city newspapers could have large-scale impact through the empathetic and intimate visual portrayal of American lives, died Sunday at his home in Eugene, Ore. He was 63.

Read the complete story at The New York Times >>

2011
03.15

Acclaimed photojournalist dies at 63

The former Register-Guard staff member is remembered for his images, his leadership and his vision

By MARK BAKER
The Register-Guard

Brian Lanker, photographed at his studio in Eugene in 1989 with his portrait of Rosa Parks.

A handful of former Register- Guard reporters and editors have gone on to win a Pulitzer Prize after leaving the newspaper. But only one former staff member in the paper’s 144-year history made The R-G his next stop after winning journalism’s most prestigious honor: Brian Lanker.

Lanker, the newspaper’s director of graphics from 1974 to 1982, died Sunday at his home in Eugene after a brief bout with pancreatic cancer. He was 63.

After leaving the newspaper, he became a nationally renowned photojournalist whose portraits graced the likes of Life and Sports Illustrated magazines, and book projects such as “I Dream a World: Portraits of Black Women Who Changed America,” and the more recent “Track Town, USA.”

Read the complete story at The Register-Guard >>

— Photograph by PAUL CARTER

2011
03.14

The World Seems Very Underexposed

Brian Lanker: Aug. 31, 1947-March 13, 2011

Brian Lanker at the end of a long but happy day at his home in Eugene, Ore., on Monday, July 12, 2010, when former staff photographers from the Topeka Capital-Journal who worked for Rich Clarkson gathered for a reunion.

By JEFF JACOBSEN

Brian Lanker has passed away. The sad news none of us wanted to hear has come.

Read Jeff Jacobsen’s essay >>

— Photograph by CARL DAVAZ